Harleston's Cranes for Peace

A New Year Resolution

At the begining of 2017 Harlestons Future passed a resolution to send a peace message from Harleston to the world. This was to be acheived by sending 1,000 paper cranes with messages of peace across the world. The resolution was inspired by a young terminally ill Japanese girl affected by radiation poisoning who sought to make 1,000 origami cranes, following a Japanese tradition, and by our swifts, which know no boundaries, flying as they do over continents and countries, town and villages on their epic migrations; our 'free-spirited emblems for people and wildlife'.

The Sadako Story

Sadako was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. She was two kilometers away from where the bomb exploded. Most of Sadako’s neighbours died, but Sadako wasn’t injured at all, at least not in any way people could see.

Up until the time Sadako was in the seventh grade (1955) she was a normal, happy girl. However, one day after an important relay race that she helped her team win, she felt extremely tired and dizzy. After a while the dizziness went away leaving Sadako to think that it was only the exertion from running the race that made her tired and dizzy. But her tranquillity did not last. Soon after her first encounter with extreme fatigue and dizziness, she experienced more incidents of the same.

One day Sadako became so dizzy that she fell down and couldn’t get up. Her school-mates informed the teacher. Later Sadako’s parents took her to the Red Cross Hospital to see what was wrong with her. Sadako found out that she had leukemia, a kind of blood cancer. Nobody could believe it.At that time they called leukemia the “A-bomb disease”. Almost everyone who got this disease died, and Sadako was very scared. She wanted to go back to school, but she had to stay in the hospital where she cried and cried.

Shortly thereafter, her best friend, Chizuko, came to visit her. Chizuko brought some origami (folding paper). She told Sadako of a legend. She explained that the crane, a sacred bird in Japan, lives for a hundred years, and if a sick person folds 1,000 paper cranes, then that person would soon get well. After hearing the legend, Sadako decided to fold 1,000 cranes in the hope that she would get well again.

Sadako’s family worried about her a lot. They often came to visit her in hospital to talk to her and to help her fold cranes. After she folded 500 cranes she felt better and the doctors said she could go home for a short time, but by the end of the first week back home the dizziness and fatigue returned and she had to go back to the hospital.

Sadako kept folding cranes even though she was in great pain. Even during these times of great pain she tried to be cheerful and hopeful. Not long afterwards, with her family standing by her bed, Sadako went to sleep peacefully, never to wake up again. She had folded a total of 644 paper cranes.

Everyone was very sad. Thirty-nine of Sadako’s classmates felt saddened by the loss of their close friend and decided to form a paper crane club to honor her. Word spread quickly. Students from 3,100 schools and from 9 foreign countries gave money to the cause. On May 5, 1958, almost three years after Sadako had died, enough money was collected to build a monument in her honor. It is now known as the Children’s Peace Monument, and is located in the center of Hiroshima Peace Park, close to the spot where the atomic bomb was dropped

© 2000-2017 Hiroshima International School.

Harleston's Peace Cranes Journey

We are following our cranes from the initial New Year's resolution, through the creation of 1,000 origami cranes and their travels across the world to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.

Cranes Rest at the Peace Park

Cranes Rest at the Peace Park

Cranes Rest at the Peace Park

Harleston's community crane, signed by the Chairman of the Town Council, President of the Harleston and District Rotary Club and the Chairman of Harleston's Future and the community's cranes with swift wingtips from 1,000 peace message orgami cranes are placed with thousands of other colourful cranes in the Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima by Robin Twigge.

Hiroshima Rotary Club

Hiroshima Rotary Club

Hiroshima Rotary Club

Welcome to Hiroshima!

We appreciate your visit at Hiroshima Center Rotary Club and the Smile Studio where the children make goods with recycled paper of thousand cranes at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.

Cranes Fly to Japan

Cranes Fly to Japan

Cranes Fly to Japan

The Harleston Peace Cranes are about to board the plane for their long flight to Japan and their final resting place at  the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.

Ready for Hiroshima

Ready for Hiroshima

Ready for Hiroshima

Our origami crane wing-tips and a large signed community crane were handed into Robin's care by Cllr Frances Bickley of the Town Council and Pat Webb President of Harleston and District Rotary Club and Peace Officer East Anglia, for their journey to the Memorial Peace Park in Hiroshima, Japan next Friday.  Robin hopes to leave one set of wingtips and the community crane, near to the statue of a young Japanese girl who died from the effects of the atomic bomb in WWII a renowned place to make such a gesture. The second set of wingtips will return to Harleston, nearing the end of their year-long journeys.

A Beacon of Light

A Beacon of Light

A Beacon of Light

Shortly after the ringing of the bell, the beacon was lit to send a message of peace to the world. The paper cranes bore handwritten messages and drawings by Harleston and district school children, residents, visitors and community representatives, with the prayers, wishes and sentiments of over 1,000 people who had contributed to the project. Releasing the messages into smoke will carry them across boundaries between towns, villages, countries and continents - wherever the wind will take them.

Bells Ring Around the World

Bells Ring Around the World

Bells Ring Around the World

On Tuesday 20 March at 12.15 pm (US/Eastern Daylight Time) the 48th Annual UN Children’s Peace Bell Ceremony took place in New York. At exactly the same time, in Harleston, Norfolk, England at 4.15pm (UTC/GMT), the town’s own Peace Bell was rung, joining gongs and bells ringing around the world as part of a celebration for peace, justice and the care of Earth.

Harleston Town Crier, Norman Steer, keeper of Harleston's Peace Bell rang it for each of the earth's seven continents in turn, as seven large white origami cranes representing each continent were placed with 1,000 smaller, coloured cranes held in a large heart-shaped container.


Click on the image below to start a short video of the ceremony.



Out of this World

Out of this World

On the day that these cranes' paper wingtips were launched on their astonishing 36km flight to the edge of space by the Earth to Sky project at Bishop, California, Harleston's prayers for peace became undoubtedly the highest in the world that day.

The photograph shows the 1,000 wingtips in their clear sphere, set inside the United Nations wreath symbol and under the black canopy of space. The second sphere contains little cut-out swifts to flutter when the research balloon popped. The payload is topped by a small origami crane.  Click on the image below to start a short video of the flight.

When the research balloon 'popped' 36km (22 miles) 118,000 feet above central California, Harleston's little cut-out swifts took to the air in weightless freefall inside their clear plastic sphere below our 1,000 origami-crane wingtips and peace message - undoubtedly the highest in the world that day.

Flight but no Pictures

Flight but no Pictures

Flight but no Pictures

There is some good news and bad news about our flight. The cranes flew on 29 November and they traveled to the stratosphere, reaching an altitude of 31 km. Unfortunately, the camera failed just before launch and did not record the journey. The attached screenshot shows how it looked just before liftoff. The display was roughed up a bit when it landed in the desert, and a few of the cranes escaped onto the desert floor. Imagine, Harleston cranes going AWOL in Death Valley. That is definitely a First! But they have been recovered. The good news is our globe can be restored for a second flight, probably next week.

Delay to Launch

Delay to Launch

The launch is on hold because of strong winds.  Our little cranes are a small part of a very large project to monitor atmospheric radiation. Since 2015, Spaceweather.com and the students of Earth to Sky Calculus have conducted an ambitious, ongoing campaign to measure atmospheric radiation around our planet. So far they have flown more than 200 space weather balloons in four countries and a dozen US states.

Ready for Outer Space

Ready for Outer Space

Ready for Outer Space

Our Cranes are next in the flight queue, due to launch on 5 November. If all goes well it will be the highest peace message in the world on that day. If you are thinking that payload looks scruffy, it's because it has flown it more than 30 times from four countries: Chile, Norway, Sweden, and the USA. It's international pedigree is appropriate to our flight of worldwide peace.

The Next Journey of Peace

The Next Journey of Peace

The Next Journey of Peace

1,000 origami cranes, each carrying Harleston's message of peace and personal thoughts from hundreds of pupils and students, with swift-printed wingtips hung all summer in a large display. In September the swift-printed wing-tips were cut off and placed in a clear sphere to represent the planet. The sphere travelled to the UN and Ground Zero. 1,000 Wing-tips are now embarking with a peace message on an epic journey via California, hopefully to the edge of space , where, if all goes well, they will be the highest peace message in the world on that day. Our Town Crier announced their departure in inimitable traditional style.

Quite a mission for the people of Harleston, The Rotary Club and Harleston's Future. We have our fingers crossed for their safe return.

UN International Day of Peace

UN International Day of Peace

UN International Day of Peace

The Town Crier Bell has been dedicated as Harleston's Peace Bell.

Revd Nigel Tuffnell said: '….. whenever it rings and and our town crier delivers the news, now and into the future, each ring will echo across the generations and down the years, the spirit of our Harleston’s message of hope for peace today.

Town Crier, Noman Steer said: 'I dedicate this bell as Harleston's Peace Bell. I ring it seven times to represent the seven continents of the world and so that it’s peace message is loud and clear.' 'People of the world .. take note …[Ring] … I bear a message from the good people of Harleston …[Ring] … They wish you well, with every ring of this bell …[Ring] … let there be peace at home …[Ring] … let there be peace abroad ….. let there be peace everywhere …[Ring] … that is our wish . [Ring] [Ring]'

Cranes Return

Cranes Return

Cranes Return

Haleston's 1,000 origami cranes have returned in time for a short ceremony at midday on International Day of Peace (21 September). Over the last week their wing-tips have been taken symbolically to the United Nation in New York and to Ground Zero and are expected back for the ceremony. The ring of the Town Crier's Bell will be dedicated to peace, so our message of hope for peacetoday, can echo across the generations and down the years.

Hundreds of the origami cranes carry a message of peace from children and students in Alburgh, Denton, Pulham and Harleston schools as a well as a community message linking our swifts - emblems of free-sprit for people and wildlife -, with cranes and peace - all of which know no boundaries

Cranes Visit Ground Zero

Cranes Visit Ground Zero

Cranes Visit Ground Zero

Harleston's cranes lie next to the people who lost their lives in the attacks at the World Trade Centre.  Occupying eight of the 16 acres at the World Trade Center, the 9/11 Memorial is a tribute to the past and a place of hope for the future.  The 2,983 names of the men, women, and children killed in the attacks of September 11, 2001 and February 26, 1993, are inscribed into bronze parapets surrounding the twin Memorial pools, located in the footprints of the Twin Towers.

Cranes Fly to America

Cranes Fly to America

Cranes Fly to America

Robin Twigge holds the peace globe containing the 1,000 wing tips in his hand as he is about to board the plane for their flight to New York.

Harleston Sends Peace Message to United Nations

Harleston Sends Peace Message to United Nations

Harleston Sends Peace Message to United Nations

Simultaneously with the ringing of the United Nations’ Peace Bell in New York (9.00 - 9.30am US Eastern time), bells will peal at St John’s Church in Harleston between 2.00 and 2.30pm (BST) on Friday 15 September as a forerunner to the UN's International Day of Peace (21 September).

The chimes will bid Robin Twigge from Harleston and District Rotary Club 'bon voyage' as he carries wingtips clipped from each of the 1,000 origami crane peace messages on display in the church to the Peace Bell outside the United Nations building in New York. He will then take them on to 'Ground Zero' - the memorial at the site of the 'Twin Towers' - before returning the wing tips to Harleston for a ceremonry to mark Peace Day on 21 September.

'Taking the wing tips to such symbolic places in New York is a small but powerful way to unite our community’s hopes and wishes for local harmony and international peace with peoples across the globe', said Mrs Pat Webb, President of Harlestonand District Rotary Club.

The Peace Bell, cast from coins sent by children from all over the world, was donated by Japan to the United Nations in 1954.

Bell Ringing

Bell Ringing

Bell Ringing

Starston Pealers Hand-bell Ringers, ring Ode to Joy, as part Harleston's event timed to coincide with the ringing of the Peace Bell at the United Nations in New York. The programme included peace readings and the ringing of St John's Church Bell for a minute at either end of the half hour ceremony. Meanwhile Robin and Vickie are on the way to Heathrow.

Wing Tips in a Peace Globe

Wing Tips in a Peace Globe

Wing Tips in a Peace Globe

The wing tips were put into a glass globe to represent a world full of peace. The globe can be held in the palm of a hand, just as peace is in the hands of us all.

Our cranes are now ready to fly across the world to carry their message of peace from the people of Harleston.

1,000 Wing Tips

1,000 Wing Tips

1,000 Wing Tips

The tips of our cranes were cut off, each wing tip is printed with a symbol of the Harleston Swift so that they can help carry our message of peace across the world.

Cutting the Wing Tips

Cutting the Wing Tips

Cutting the Wing Tips

The wing tips, clipped from peace messages contributed by schoolchildren, the elderly, and all ages in between, will be carried in a single white paper origami crane. It’s “flight” to New York will be the first stage of a long journey (ultimate destination the Memorial Peace Park at Hiroshima, Japan) for the wingtips of the 1,000 cranes which have been on display in the nave of St John’s throughout the summer holidays and has been a community-wide project..

Peace Book

Peace Book

Peace Book

Message reads: To mark the flight of 1,000 origami cranes and messages of our desires for international peace and local harmony from the communities of Redenhall with Harleston and surrounding villages. *** Summer 2017.

Cranes in the Church

Cranes in the Church

Cranes in the Church

The 1,000 origami cranes were strung together by hand, by local volunteers to form colourful hanging strings of our birds in flight.  There will be a summer-long flight of the origami cranes in the roof of St John's Church. The cranes are all individually unquie, just like every person in the world, but are all made the same, just like very person in the world. The many colours representing the many colours, cultures and nations of our world.

Peace Flag Flies

Peace Flag Flies

Peace Flag Flies

Students and teachers from Harleston schools join Mrs Pat Web (President, Harleston and District Rotary Club and East Anglia Peace Officer) at the launch of the 'flight of cranes' display.

Threading

Threading

Threading

The many and varied origami cranes were strung together by volunteers, to symbolise the joining together of the many and varied people of the world.

Joy, Pauline, Doreen and Mary from Malthouse Court retirement complex with threaded strands of cranes.

Peace Message

Peace Message

Peace Message

Ian Carstairs, Harleston resident and co-ordinator of the peace project, said 'This has touched everyone who has been involved. It has been moving to read the messages, especially those from the young people'. One 13-year-old captured it so succinctly. He wrote: ‘Look, we are all different … deal with it!’ … another …. ‘alone I could build a wall but with friends I can build anything’ …. and another ‘It only takes one human to make a friend, and it only takes one friend to make a difference'.

The Messages of Peace

The Messages of Peace

The Messages of Peace

Some 900 Students and pupils in the Harleston Cluster of schools  (ASHS and Harleston Alburgh and Denton and Pulham Primaries) will be invited to write a message for peace on multi-coloured sheets of paper decorated with small swifts.  The sheets will then be folded into traditional origami cranes and turned into a large display in St John’s Church, Harleston for the summer.

1000 Origami Cranes for Peace 'given wings'

1000 Origami Cranes for Peace 'given wings'

1000 Origami Cranes for Peace 'given wings'

Following Harleston’s Future’s New Year Resolution to promote making 1000 Japanese origami cranes for peace, Oscar Simmonds, a year 10 student and one of a group of Peace Advocates at Archbishop Sancroft High School (ASHS), Harleston, South Norfolk, Joined Mrs Pat Webb, Peace Officer, Rotary District 1080 – East Anglia and Vice-President of the Rotary Club of Harleston and District, to ‘give wings’ to the resolution. The Project will also combine making the origami cranes, with the town’s well-known swifts initiative. 

Mrs Webb and Oscar, were joined by Cllr Barry Woods, Chair of Redenhall with Harleston Town Council and Rob Connelly, Deputy Head-teacher at ASHS.

A New Year's Resolution

A New Year's Resolution

At the begining of 2017 Harlestons Future passed a resolution to send a peace message from Harleston to the world. This was to be acheived by sending 1,000 paper cranes with messages of peace across the world. The resolution was inspired by a young terminally ill Japanese girl affected by radiation poisoning who sought to make 1,000 origami cranes, following a Japanese tradition, and by our swifts, which know no boundaries, flying as they do over continents and countries, town and villages on their epic migrations; our 'free-spirited emblems for people and wildlife'.


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